Unprotected sex without ejaculation chances pregnancy - B4arabCom

Unprotected sex without ejaculation chances pregnancy

Unprotected sex without ejaculation chances pregnancy

By following these theories, we can frequently influence reproductive processes to function the way we want them to. Nevertheless, we seldom know for certain how or why this happens. At best, any therapy or procedure to facilitate healthy reproduction is imprecise and partial, although it may turn out to be successful. Given the incredible intricacy of the natural reproductive process, there is no such thing as a sure cure when it malfunctions. There are only degrees to which certain problems can be minimized. Most infertility patients assume modern science has more answers than, in fact, it does.

Before I go into specific detail about how antibiotic therapy has helped my patients reach their goals, I’d like to set some parameters for that discussion. This chapter will briefly explore what we can say, with some certainty, about what makes a couple infertile. It will also look into the more widespread and damaging misconceptions about infertility I’ve encountered in talking with my patients. Definitions of infertility vary greatly even within the medical profession. Mosher of the National Centre for Health Statistics, which sets the standard for many medical specialists, a couple is considered infertile “if they are not surgically sterile and have not been able to conceive after a year or more of unprotected intercourse. I define infertility much more strictly, adding two other conditions. First, I don’t consider a couple fertile unless the female partner has been able to carry a baby full term to a live birth.

Second, I don’t consider a couple fertile unless the baby they produce is healthy-that is, not underdeveloped, colicky, or unusually vulnerable to infectious illnesses. Many doctors would agree with my first additional condition. Very few would extend their definition of infertility to include my second additional condition. Be that as it may, I believe human reproductive systems-male and female-are wondrously well designed to produce healthy babies. For fourteen years, I continued to be a practicing obstetrician despite strong temptations to devote myself entirely to my research and therapy in reproductive health. I retained my role as an obstetrician because I insisted on superintending the final results of that research and therapy.